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EVERYWHERE MAN


traditional defense industry role—with a different kind of eye.


“Tat’s just a reality, and we’re not going to be able to change it with the open- ing of a small office” of DOD’s Defense Innovation Unit nested amid major tech companies. “But I’m very, very gung-ho of the idea of having more and more of a presence by the Pentagon not just in Sili- con Valley, but these tech clusters all over the nation. It’s incredibly important for them to be out there technology-scouting, finding opportunities.”


Te reason lies in the very nature of the game-changing technology that exists today. Unlike the atomic energy or aircraft carrier or ballistic missile of earlier gener- ations, the organizations that research, develop, buy and use the technology will be both government and the private sector, and it will comprise both civilian and military applications.


“So you think of something like artificial intelligence [AI] or robotics or big data: Tese are areas where the breakthroughs won’t be coming out of exclusively govern- mental labs funded primarily by the Defense Department. Tey’re going to be coming from lots of different direc- tions. Te users of them are not going to be exclusively governmental or even mili- tary in the first generation, the way we saw with some of these past key technologies, even arguably the start of the computer.”


Additionally, given the nature of the tech- nology, it’s becoming easier and easier to use—AI, for example—because of machine intelligence. A drone that is flown by a brain-machine interface lowers the barrier to use by “all sorts of different actors; the ‘pilot’ didn’t have to learn how to become a pilot to fly this complex piece of machinery,” Singer noted.


TALKING TECH


Singer discusses new technology with an officer and DOD civilian at an Air Force facility. Advances such as artificial intelligence and brain-machine interfacing will change the way the Army conducts war. (Photo courtesy of P.W. Singer)


PREPARING FOR CYBERWAR


Capt. Joe Spracklen, left, and Capt. Brad Pemberton conduct cyberspace training in August during Operation Tiger Stance, a situational cyberspace training exercise designed to prepare cyber protection teams for real-world operations. (Photo by Bill Roche, U.S. Army Cyber Command)


102


Army AL&T Magazine


January-March 2019


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